Making the Grade: Monitoring the Impact of a Mentorship Program on Native Students' Academic Achievement

By:
Dr. Lorraine Beaudin,
Dr. Thelma M. Gunn,
Dr. Peter Heffernan,
Johnel Tailfeathers
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The purpose of this research is to explore the relationship between the a school-based native mentorship program and native students' success in school. Specifically, the Mentorship program intends to help aboriginal students of a Canadian high school graduate by overcoming the blocks to educational success. The three primary goals of the project are to improve academic performance, increase participation rates of aboriginal parents and students in school activities, and encourage intercultural awareness. Activities to promote proper nutrition, adaptive self-esteem, increased student attendance, and effective study habits will be employed. Therefore, this research project is seeking to determine whether the school-based native mentorship program leads to higher graduate rates, higher grade point averages, higher school attendance, and greater intercultural awareness. The project commenced in September, 2002. This report highlights the statistical relationship of students' GPA and graduation rates with involvement with the mentorship program.


Keywords: Native Students, Attrition, Mentorship Programs
Stream: First Nations, Indigenous Peoples
Presentation Type: Virtual Presentation in English
Paper: Making the Grade


Dr. Lorraine Beaudin

Assistant Professor, Faculty of Education, University of Lethbridge
Canada


Dr. Thelma M. Gunn

Assistant Professor, -, University of Lethbridge
Canada

-

Dr. Peter Heffernan

Professor, -, University of Lethbridge
Canada

-

Johnel Tailfeathers

Lecturer, -, University of Lethbridge
Canada

-

Ref: D05P0167